Thursday, July 04, 2013

Who has the right?

Tiberge at Gallia Watch has found an interesting quote from a group in France called the CCIF (which, in English, stands for "Collective against Islamophobia in France").

The CCIF is a group which fights "Islamophobia" - a fear of Islam. It has had success in winning recognition from the powers-that-be:
in 2011 we won a true international recognition by forging a partnership with the OSCE (Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe) and becoming an advisory member of the United Nations (UN).

But here is the quote from the CCIF that Tiberge found. The words were spoken by Marwan Muhammed, spokesman for the organisation:
Who has the right to say that France in thirty or forty years will not be a Muslim country? Who has the right? Nobody has the right to take that from us, nobody has the right to deny us that hope. To deny us the right to hope for a global society faithful to Islam.

So the CCIF wants to suppress the voices of those concerned that France might become a Muslim country ("Islamophobia") whilst at the same time defending passionately the right of French Muslims to hope that France will within their own lifetimes become a Muslim country.

It's an interesting example of the way that words like "Islamophobia" are used for aggressive purposes, i.e. to disarm opposition to an agenda that is hostile to the majority.

9 comments:

  1. Lately I have been very concerned with the great number of middle eastern politicians in the government and Australian politics.

    On a very simple basis: I do not want to be ruled by foreigners as an Australian.

    Is this Islamophobia? No I think it is just a fundamental right of a people to be represented by their own people with shared interests.

    The opposite is tyranny.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's double-standards, projection, contradictions and hypocrisy for them. Or "toasted ice".

    Yes, yes. I get that you somehow want multiculturalism, diversity and the lie that somehow all ethnicities, cultures, nations, countries and races are the same, equal, good and onwards.

    Nope. That's a lie. Muslims want to go to France. Yet when France ceases to be filled with the French, then it's game over anyways and there's little left.

    France also devoured itself long beforehand. And I quote from SBDPL (Paul Kersey) from Those Who Can See:

    It may therefore be no coincidence that France, again like America, is among the first Western countries to fell demographic victim to its own negation of culture and ethnicity. In a way, history has come full circle: what France originally exported as an idea, the radically culture-blind republic, leaves her now helpless to come to grips with its own rapid de-Europeanization – the revolution devours its children, for good.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Apologies for the misspelling. I meant "I get that somehow you as a Muslim want multiculturalism, diversity and the lie that somehow all ethnicities, cultures, nations, countries and races are the same, equal, good and onwards."

    ReplyDelete
  4. In a way, history has come full circle: what France originally exported as an idea, the radically culture-blind republic, leaves her now helpless to come to grips with its own rapid de-Europeanization

    I agree with this, but at the same time the most spirited opposition right now is also coming from France, particularly from the "identitarians". They are not perfect politically (they seem to want regionalism within the EU rather than supporting the nation) but boy are they impressive in some of their actions. More on this later.

    ReplyDelete
  5. @ Mark Richardson et al...

    You may be interested in this speech given by Philippe Vardon, a French Identitarian leader, in Stockholm.

    http://crtraditionalism.wordpress.com/2013/07/01/philippe-vardon-speech-the-streets-are-our-headquarters/

    And thanks for the link.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Tiberge,

    Thanks for the link to the Identitiarian speech. I'll post on it later.

    It's 90% very good and encouraging. I'm still a little wary of the degree of pan-Europeanism though ("since I consider that my Fatherland is Europe").

    ReplyDelete
  7. I agree with this, but at the same time the most spirited opposition right now is also coming from France, particularly from the "identitarians". They are not perfect politically (they seem to want regionalism within the EU rather than supporting the nation) but boy are they impressive in some of their actions. More on this later.

    Great comment.

    ReplyDelete
  8. In the meantime, talking of France, a mayor in that country is facing a prison sentence of five years, purely and simply because he refuses to indulge the farce of "gay marriage":

    http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/17763564/french-mayor-in-court-for-defying-gay-marriage-law/

    How many Australians, however "conservative" they might think themselves to be, would dare do anything that would run the risk of incarceration?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Pius,

    The larger problem is that most "conservatives" here in Australia are openly right-liberal and so see things in the establishment liberal way. They are not going to defend the traditional family. They are more likely to be concerned that traditional roles limit women from workforce participation.

    If we are going to challenge people right now, the first thing is to challenge them to make a clear decision between right liberalism and a principled conservatism/traditionalism. To do this, we have to show them what the longer term consequences are of following along a right-liberal path.

    ReplyDelete

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.